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Technique

Here, Mark Bosnian will focus on singing techniques that will help you become the singer you were meant to be!

Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
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on Wednesday, 28 September 2011
in Technique ·

Stars Don't Always Sing Better Than You Do - by Mark BosnianPopular grammy-winning singer-songwriter John Mayer recently had to cancel all of his performances and the release of his upcoming album due to vocal problems. He has what is called a granuloma, a type of growth, on his vocal cords. This type of problem often stems from lack of good vocal technique.

What I think is interesting here is not that this happened to a popular singer—I can’t tell you how many times famous national act singers have to cancel performances, parts of tours or entire tours due to “vocal fatigue”, laryngitis, exhaustion or other code words for voice problems. What’s surprising is how many of my voice students are shocked that a singer of this stature has voice problems at all.

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Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
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on Wednesday, 02 March 2011
in Technique ·

Support is the Most Important Principle in Singing - Sing Free Now! MethodSupport is the most important principle in singing. Without it, everything else in the development of your voice is like painting a used car and calling it new. The major issues will still be present; they’ll just be covered up with a pretty veneer. I sang professionally for 10 years with absolutely no concept of support and it was very difficult for me to maintain my voice during that time. I got hoarse often, had serious trouble singing high notes; if I sang a song loudly and aggressively, I couldn’t come right back and sing one cleanly and gently. I often spent my days worrying about whether my voice would work that night. It wasn’t a lot of fun to have so little control over my voice but I believed that that was what singers had to go through.

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Vocal Assessment

Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
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on Wednesday, 02 March 2011
in Technique ·

If it’s not measurable, it’s not valuable

Vocal Assessment - Big Three Vocal Principles: support, registration and resonationI’ve often had students attempt to describe what they hear in a recording of their own voice. “That’s awful,” “It sounds terrible,” or “I don’t like it” may be the first words out of their mouths. When I ask someone to elaborate, most of the time they use the same types of phrases to repeat the same theme. The problem with this approach is that nothing measurable is being described and it is extremely difficult to change a vocal performance when you can’t measure it. So how do you measure what you’re singing?

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Warming Up and Cooling Down

Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
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on Wednesday, 02 March 2011
in Technique ·

Warming Up and Cooling Down for best Vocal PerformanceCooling down after a vocal performance is just as important as warming up. Because we are dealing with muscles, they must be warmed up before being exerted and cooled down afterwards to help prevent stiffening. The main reasons to warm-up and stretch out muscles are: 1) to prevent injury, 2) to be able to work longer before tiring, and 3) to increase range of motion. Too many singers do too little warm up before singing and then are disappointed in the results.

Too many singers do too little warm up before singing and then are disappointed in the results. Merely singing a couple of scales or running through a song lightly on the way to a performance is not an efficient way to warm up.

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From a High Note to a Low Note

Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
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on Wednesday, 02 March 2011
in Technique ·

From a High Note to a Low NoteWhen moving from a high note to a low note, very often singers experience the low note becoming noisy, breathy, out of tune, or unstable.  This may seem strange in that you would probably agree that singing a low note should be easier than singing a high note. Why the trouble?  Here is what can often happen.

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Perfect Performing

Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
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on Monday, 07 February 2011
in Technique ·

Christina Aguilera screwed up the National Anthem at the Super BowlI got a call early yesterday from radio station KPAM in Portland, OR wanting to know if I could be interviewed live on the Bob Miller morning show to talk about how Christina Aguilera screwed up the National Anthem at the Super Bowl. I agreed, and during the 20 minutes before they called me back, I jumped on the Internet to review her performance. As I listened to it again, I couldn’t really see or hear what the fuss was. And, oh, what a fuss there was!

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Feel vs. Sound in Singing

Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
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on Tuesday, 20 July 2010
in Technique ·

Chris Martin of Cold Play using a ear piece in concerts.I was working with one of my students and he relayed having blown out his voice at a performance because he couldn't hear.  Being able to hear yourself when you sing is very important but is not always what happens.

If you're performing through a sound system you may not have monitors, you may not be able to hear the monitors, you may be trying to sing above music that is very loud or for whatever reason the acoustics of the room may cause you not to be able to hear yourself.

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Circadian Rhythms

Posted by Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian
Mark Bosnian is an award-winning singer-songwriter who has performed in Africa, Europe, and Central and South ...
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 10 January 2010
in Technique ·

Negative Feedback Loop - Circadian RhythmCircadian rhythms are the pattern of human biological activity in a 24-hour period, and there is definitely a connection between circadian rhythms and singing. People will find that if they are used to singing early in the morning, as in church choir singers, that their body learns to expect to do what it has to do to sing early in the morning and will have a much more difficult time doing what it has to do to sing later in the evening.

The opposite is true of many people who sing in bands and perform in bars or nightclubs. Singers who are accustomed to singing in the evening and are then suddenly faced with a gig that is early in the morning may not be prepared to respond in the way they need to. It takes practice and awareness to be able sing at a different time than your body is used to.

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Five Tips for Better Singing

Vocal Registration is like an Automatic or Manual Transmission in a Car

The heavy and light registers of every voice (sometimes called “chest” voice and “head” voice or falsetto) can operate automatically as you sing higher or lower pitches and you can learn to manually shift registers to get different sounds. This gives you the option of sounding the way you want to on any given word or line in a song. The Sing Free Now! Method helps you create many choices—not just one sound when you sing.

Singing in pure heavy register with dark vowel color to establish the strength of the voice. I teach you how to make a tone called “dark vowel color” that will allow you to sing higher notes with more ease and control that you ever thought possible. This teaches the body how to set up for high notes and will allow you to then sing them with whatever tone you want (yes, you can intentionally change the tone of your voice.)

Modifying vowels to “oo” as pitches get higher. This technique will help you to sing high notes easier by slightly changing the pronunciation of vowels. The effects of this are dramatic.

Modifying vowels to “ah” as pitches get lower. This technique will give you stronger and more present low notes.

Singing different ratios of balanced registration. You will be able to blend heavy and light register in whatever ratios you want to create more colors on your palette to paint with. Another way to have many options with which to sing—not just one “right” sound that most voice teachers demand you use.

Using Scales of 1-to-10 for the Bridge to Communicate to the Engine Room

If you think of your body as if it were the crew in the engine room of a ship and your mind as if it were the captain of the ship, you can learn to send commands to your body and get the vocal results you desire. I teach you how to assign a number on a scale of 1-to-10 to any vocal element so that the crew in the engine room knows exactly what your intention is. With the Sing Free Now! Method you’ll just have to picture the sound you want and your body will make that sound.

Tell the Story of the Song and Get Your Audience Rooting for You

Through song analysis and dynamics exercises I will show you how to introduce emotion and style to your singing. This allows you to connect the story of the song to your audience--your main job as a singer. If the audience is captivated by your story-telling, perfect delivery becomes less critical and you leave the audience wanting more.

Learning about The Vocal Defense Mechanism and How to Override it

We all have a Vocal Defense Mechanism (VDM) that is a subconscious system working to protect you from harming your voice, from embarrassing yourself, and from working too hard during singing. Singing a loud note, singing a high note, or singing anything that seems in the least bit threatening can trigger this mechanism. It often sabotages your singing, making it harder for you to do what you want with your voice. The Sing Free Now! Method shows you how to override the VDM so that you can sing what you want to sing the way you want to sing it.

Using Interim Sounds vs. Always Going for Performance Sounds

It is often easier and faster for you to develop a performance sound by practicing a sound you would not perform with. This sound may seem unmusical to you at first but it will develop the strength, coordination, and control you need to make the performance sound you want. It will get you to that point more quickly than banging your head against a performance sound that you cannot make at first.